[ARCHIVED CATALOG] 2012-2013 Graduate Academic Catalog 
    
    May 07, 2021  
[ARCHIVED CATALOG] 2012-2013 Graduate Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Graduate Studies in Criminal Justice


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Master of Science in Criminal Justice

Dr. Robert Diemer, Director, Professor of Criminal Justice
Dr. Ernest Vendrell, Assistant Director, Associate Professor of Criminal Justice
Dr. Eloy Nunez, Associate Professor of Criminal Justice
Dr. Leonard Territo, Distinguished Visiting Professor of Criminal Justice
Peter Wubbenhorst, Esq., Associate Professor of Criminal Justice
Christine Sereni-Massinger, Esq., Associate Professor of Criminal Justice, Graduate Criminal Justice

The primary mission of the Master of Science in Criminal Justice Program is to serve both active and aspiring criminal justice professionals. The curriculum is designed to provide and enhance their knowledge, skills, and values for the purpose of increasing the effectiveness, professionalism, and policy-making abilities of criminal justice administrators.

Expected Program Outcomes

  1. Graduates should demonstrate an ability to a) use computerized databases to access criminal justice policy research; b) evaluate the methodologies, findings, and conclusions of such studies; and c) use this information in the development, implementation, and evaluation of agency policies and procedures.
  2. Graduates should a) know the history and development of ethical standards that are relevant to criminal justice administration; b) understand how leadership can affect organizational ethics; and c) develop skills for the practical application of ethical standards within the criminal justice system.
  3. Graduates should demonstrate an ability to be effective criminal justice agency human resource managers. To this end they should a) be knowledgeable about the current issues and innovations in personnel resource management; b) understand trends in management of human resources of an agency; and c) recognize and explain the most effective human resource management programs in criminal justice.
  4. Graduates should demonstrate an ability to be effective criminal justice agency fiscal resource managers and planners. To this end they should a) be knowledgeable about the current issues and innovations in fiscal resource development, budgeting, accounting, and reporting; b) understand and articulate the most desirable methods and systems in use in criminal justice agencies; and c) be able to discuss the most effective means of integrating long- and short-range planning and budgeting in criminal justice agencies.
  5. Graduates should a) be thoroughly aware of the complex legal environment within which their agencies must operate; and b) be able to articulate an understanding of personnel law, issues of civil liability, and substantive and procedural laws related to criminal justice agencies and their administration.
  6. Graduates should a) demonstrate an awareness of currently existing criminal justice information resources and systems; b) demonstrate the technical understanding necessary to effectively apply these resources to the administration of criminal justice; and c) be able to articulate policy issues created or impacted by information resource systems and technology.
  7. Graduates should a) be able to understand and articulate the normal processes through which criminal justice policies are developed and implemented; b) be able to identify public, private, and special interest organizations and individuals involved in criminal justice policy making; and c) be able to articulate methods by which the success of public policy making may be evaluated.
  8. Graduates should a) be able to understand and articulate the role of leadership in a criminal justice agency; b) be able to articulate the desirable traits in a criminal justice leader; and c) be able to distinguish among leadership, management, and supervision.
  9. Graduates should a) be able to define and discuss the effective components of "futures studies" as applied to criminal justice administration; b) be able to identify major trends and conditions affecting the State of Florida, its communities, and its criminal justice agencies; and c) discuss methods by which such trends and conditions may be effectively anticipated, identified, assessed, and monitored.
  10. Graduates should a) be aware of the changing nature and substance of criminal justice issues in their discipline and communities; and b) be able to articulate an understanding of the more critical current issues and problems facing criminal justice administrators.
  11. Graduates should have the skills, attitudes, and knowledge base to apply the content of their postgraduate education to addressing substantive criminal justice administrative challenges and goals.

Master of Science in Critical Incident Management

Dr. Robert Diemer, Director, Professor of Criminal Justice
Dr. Ernest Vendrell, Assistant Director, Associate Professor of Criminal Justice
Dr. Eloy Nunez, Associate Professor of Criminal Justice
Christine Sereni-Massinger, Esq., Associate Professor of Criminal Justice, Graduate Criminal Justice

The Master of Science in Critical Incident Management is designed to prepare individuals from the public and private sectors, nongovernmental organizations, and the military to manage the diverse challenges facing our nation as a result of recent disasters and complex global threats. The comprehensive curriculum is designed to expose students to the necessary theoretical knowledge and practical skills that are necessary for effectively managing a wide range of critical incidents. Students will critically analyze historical and contemporary case studies to identify best practices for identifying threats, minimizing risk, and effectively leading organizations in times of crisis. Students will also gain an understanding of the sociological and psychological aspects of disasters and how these can affect those involved in catastrophic events.

Expected Program Outcomes

Graduates of the Master of Science in Critical Incident Management Program should be able to articulate and/or demonstrate the following knowledge and skills:

  1. The legal and regulatory environment affecting the field of emergency and disaster management, including the role of federal, state, and local governments within this legal framework.
  2. Various financial management concepts and techniques applicable to the field of emergency and disaster management, and how the strategic management process affects budgeting, financial management, and performance management.
  3. The political dynamics of emergency and disaster management and the importance of various public policy formulation and implementation issues, to include problem identification, stakeholder analysis, agenda setting, and interest groups.
  4. Contemporary organizational leadership theories and concepts applicable to the field of emergency and disaster management, to include transformational leadership, motivation, effective organizational communication, group dynamics, organizational culture and climate, professional development, and individual and organizational ethics.
  5. Various techniques and concepts used in research and evaluation, and how these apply to selected policies, procedures, practices, and programs applicable to emergency and disaster management.
  6. The historical and philosophical basis of terrorism, and how to design counter-terrorism programs to protect the public and first responders from identified threats by minimizing risk.
  7. The nature of disaster, the complexities of disaster response operations, and the role of various critical incident management personnel in managing disaster response operations.
  8. The role of risk identification and assessment in emergency and disaster management, including existing legislative and administrative mandates concerning the detection, prevention, and mitigation of hazards and risk.
  9. The psychological trauma that may be experienced by victims and first responders to disasters as well as the treatment strategies that may be needed, to include post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and critical incident stress management (CISM).
  10. The relevant sociological research regarding disasters, to include individual, group, organization, and community responses to, and recovery from, disasters.
  11. Contemporary principles and practices of hazard mitigation, to include the tools, techniques, and resources applicable to planning for and implementing successful hazard mitigation programs.

 

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