[ARCHIVED CATALOG] 2012-2013 Graduate Academic Catalog 
    
    May 06, 2021  
[ARCHIVED CATALOG] 2012-2013 Graduate Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Graduate Studies in Theology


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Master of Arts in Theology

Dr. Anthony B. Kissel, Chair, Interim Director, Associate Professor of Theology/Religion
Dr. Leland Tyson Anderson, Professor of Religion and Philosophy
Dr. Michael Cooper, Assistant Professor of Theology/Religion
Dr. James Cross, Assistant Professor of Theology/Religion
Dr, Aaron Fehir, Assistant Professor of Philosophy
Dr. Thomas Humphries, Assistant Professor of Theology/Religion
Dr. Robert Imperato, Professor of Theology/Religion
Dr. Michael McLaughlin, Assistant Professor of Theology/Religion
Dr. Michael J. Tkacik, Associate Professor of Theology/Religion
Dr. Astrid Vicus, Associate Professor of Philosophy
Dr. Randall Woodard, Assistant Professor of Theology/Religion

The master of arts in theology is designed to expand the professional knowledge and skills of those engaged in or preparing for pastoral leadership and service, as well as for all who seek advanced theological education. The curriculum offers a flexible adult learning model for nontraditional graduate students, lay ministers, and candidates to the diaconate.

Expected Program Outcomes

  1. Read Scripture and other primary religious texts using the most appropriate techniques of contemporary scripture scholarship.
  2. Explore and investigate how the values of Christianity critique the normal order of things and offer a new way of living.
  3. Discuss the major theological questions, such as the mystery of God, Jesus as the Son of God, and our own human origin, destiny, and purpose in life.
  4. Describe the ethical and cultural implications of a transcendent understanding of life in light of Catholic theology.
  5. Describe the contributions of and the challenges to the Catholic tradition.
  6. Discuss the beliefs and practices found in Catholicism—including ecclesiology and the sacraments—and those found in other religions and atheism.
  7. Develop a practical theology and spirituality to empower the People of God to serve in response to God's call.

Learning Objectives

  1. Graduates competent to read Scripture and other primary religious texts using the most appropriate tools of scripture scholarship.
  2. Graduates able to explain the role of humility and contemplative experience (for example, as used to critique or guide).
  3. Graduates able to discuss major religious questions (such as the mystery of God, Jesus as the Son of God, and our own human origin, destiny, and purpose in life).
  4. Graduates able to describe the ethical and cultural implications of a transcendent understanding of life.
  5. Graduates able to describe the contributions of and the challenges to the Catholic tradition.
  6. Graduates able to discuss the beliefs and practices found in Catholicism—in particular, ecclesiology and the sacraments.
  7. Graduates able to discuss the beliefs and practices found in other religions and atheism. 8. Graduates able to develop a practical theology and spirituality in the service and practice of social justice.

Graduates of the program should have acquired the following knowledge and skills:

  1. A historical-critical approach to Scripture and tradition.
  2. A historical sense of the development of the Catholic Church, including the Church in the United States.
  3. The capacity for critical theological reflection and ethical judgment.
  4. A personal, as well as ministerially oriented, spirituality through an exploration of the great schools and figures of Christian spirituality.
  5. Appropriate skills for leadership in liturgical and ministerial service.
  6. Use of pastoral technology for the work of evangelization and leadership.
  7. A theological understanding of contemporary culture and its challenges to, and opportunities for, faith and ministry.

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